Each commission, whether it be for a large memorial or a token of gratitude, demands the same time honored artistic approach of design, project development and creation. Mr. Casteel works very closely with the client to deliver not just a product, but a visionary's culminations of heart and hands.

Contact Mr. Casteel for sculptural commissioning.

The following projects represent a sampling of Mr. Casteel's work:

 
 

Commissions

 
54th Penna. Vol. Inf. Monument: Commissioned in 1997 by the Col. Jacob Campbell Camp, Sons of the Union Veterans of
Johnstown, PA, the monument was to replace the original that was ultimately destroyed by successive floods in
Johnstown. (Erected in the city park and unveiled in November 2000)
   
Col. Sandie Pendleton Monument: Erected in Woodstock, VA the monument stands near the site of the Dr. Murphy House where Col. Pendleton was taken after being wounded at Fishers Hill, VA. Following two days of suffering, he passed away. His body was removed to Lexington, VA and buried near the grave of his former commander,
Gen. T.J. "Stonewall" Jackson.
   
Mt. Jackson Confederate Hospital Memorial: Privately commissioned, the monument bronze tablets contain the names of all those known to have died and are buried in the Mt. Jackson Confederate Cemetery. In the center of the monument is a bronze bas-relief tablet representing the Mt. Jackson Confederate Hospital as it appeared during the War. (unveiled in 1998).
   
General James Longstreet Memorial: Commissioned by the North Carolina division, Sons of Confederate Veterans, and erected in Gettysburg National Military Park, the Longstreet equestrian is the only monument dedicated to a Confederate officer who fought at Gettysburg. The monument was erected without a pedestal to become not less heroic, but more personal and approachable by those who visit Lee's lieutenant. The General was ceremoniously unveiled in 1998.
For more information about this memorial, please be sure to read It's About Time: The Sculpting of the General James Longstreet Memorial.
   
Lee Co. Memorial: Erected in front of the new Lee Co. Courthouse and unveiled in 2007, the monument is to honor Gen. R.E. Lee and the 100th Anniversary of Lee Co. It was commissioned by the Lee Society of Lee County, NC.
   
6th Maryland Infantry Monument: Known as the “Breakthrough Regiment”, the 6th was instrumental in breaking the Confederate line at Petersburg, Va. in 1864 and forcing Gen. R. E. Lee’s command to retreat toward Appomattox, and later surrendering in April 1865. The descendants of this heroic force gathered together and commissioned Mr. Casteel to create a simple yet elegant monument to honor those who fought on the hallowed ground now within the bounds of Pamplin Park. A bronze bas relief tablet, mounted on granite, depicts the 6th Md. breaking through the Confederate line during that eventful action. The monument was dedicated on April 2, 2011.
   
Nancy Wilkins Memorial: This memorial was commissioned by the friends of Nancy Wilkins and erected in 2007 in Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg, PA. Nancy was not only a historian and preservationist, but an old friend as well. From western Pennsylvania, she was closely connected to the 11th PA Vol. Info. and their mascot. So, before Nancy passed away, it was decided that she should rest with her favorite pup, Sallie of the 11th P.V.I.
   
Rev. Peter Muhlenberg: To be erected in 2008 near the old Courthouse in Woodstock, Virginia. Rev. Muhlenberg had an illustrious career as a minister, soldier and statesman. During the early days of the Revolutionary War, he was asked by Gen. George Washington to raise a company of men from the Shenandoah Valley to help defend the homeland. His most famous sermon was when he stated there was "a time to pray and a time to fight, now is the time to fight!" Opening his vestments and exposing his Continental uniform, he immediately went forth to raise his company and go to war. (Commissioned by the Town of Woodstock, VA).
   
Gen. Albert G. Jenkins Memorial: While Lee was advancing on Gettysburg, PA, Gen. Jenkins was nearing Harrisburg and preparing to take the city. Shortly after arriving, General Jenkins was recalled by Lee because of the severe activity around Gettysburg. The monument erected by his headquarters and the Northern most advance of any Confederate unit, was commissioned by the Camp Curtin Historical Society and was unveiled in 2005.
   
Gen. Ambrose Burnside portrait: Commissioned in 1999 by the descendants of Union Gen. Ambrose Burnside, the portrait resides in the family home.
   
Potter bust: Mr. Potter sits on a pedestal in front of his family memorial. A loving father, businessman and community leader, he was honored by his family with his likeness in bronze. (Commissioned by the Potter family in 2001).
   
Delphic Sybil: A rendition of Michelangelo's famous oracle painted on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, Italy. Commissioned by the family of a professor of ancient history, the bronze bas-relief now graces the stone of his final resting place.
   
Archangel Michael: Mentioned in the book of Revelations and presented as the field commander of the Army of God, he is regarded as the patron Saint of the warrior, police officer and soldier, particularly paratroopers. (Commissioned by a commercial enterprise for reproduction purposes.)
   
Kentucky State Memorial: Commissioned by the State of Kentucky in 1998 to honor those individuals who served during the Vicksburg Campaign of 1863, the Memorial features life size bronze figures of Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Union President Abraham Lincoln, both sons of Kentucky. The bronze figures placed on a low pedestal are surrounded by a plaza and back wall of granite listing all the confederate units present during the engagement. The memorial was unveiled in October 2004.
   
13th N.C. monument replica: Sculpted for the N.C. Living History Assoc. Charlotte, NC, 1999.
Located near Boonsboro, Maryland, at Fox’s Gap, on South Mountain, the life size bronze figure of a wounded confederate color barer mounted of black granite was commissioned in 1997 by the Living History Association of Mecklenburg Co., Charlotte, North Carolina and unveiled October 2003. The monument was erected to honor all the North Carolina troops who served at South Mountain during the Gettysburg Campaign.
   
President Jefferson Davis and Sons: Commissioned by the Sons of Confederate Veterans to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the birth of the only president of the Southern Confederacy, the life size bronze features Jeff Davis, son Joseph Davis and Jim Limber, a mulatto boy adopted by the Davis family while living in Richmond, VA, capitol of the confederacy. The work was erected and dedicated in 2010 at Beauvoir, Biloxi, Mississippi, the last home of the Davis family.
   
Confederate POW Monument: This life size bronze figure of a confederate POW represents the harsh internment endured during the civil war by southern soldiers at Point Lookout MD. Sitting atop a large pedestal and surrounded by flags of the confederate states, the monument is located in Confederate Memorial Park, Point Lookout Maryland and was commissioned by the Point Lookout Confederate POW Descendants Association and dedicated in 2009.
   
Brothers: The two figure setting in bronze, life size, is reminiscent of the harsh realities of the American Civil war, brother against brother. To be erected at Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, the figures represent the real possibility of familial recognition by opposing soldiers, one Union, one Confederate, but brothers, after the horrific battle that engulfed the countryside near Fredericksburg. Privately commissioned, The Brothers, 2 castings, are located in the Fredericksburg Museum of History and at Fork Union Military Academy Admin. Hall, both in Virginia.
   
Crozet Monument: Soldier, Scholar, Engineer and Chairman of the first Board of Visitors for Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia, Claudius Crozet, born in France, served under Napoleon, after which he immigrated to the US and became a preeminent engineer in Virginia. His connection with VMI was ultimately rewarded by his burial on the grounds, with high military ceremony, in 1864. A stone monument was erected later but without a bronze likeness. Commissioned by a VMI alum, that oversight is now corrected and will be installed in 2010.
   
The United States Colored Troops Monument - Lexington Park, Md.: The USCT monument is the latest creation from Mr. Casteel’s studio. Commissioned by the United Committee for African American Contributions, and although currently in the mold and casting process, the monument is expected to be dedicated in the late fall of 2011. This stone and bronze tribute to the Union Black soldiers, drawn from the slave population of St. Mary’s Co., Md. during the War Between the States, will be only the fourth monument ever dedicated in the United States to this heroic regiment, the USCT.
   
Jefferson Memorial Cemetery War Memorial- Pittsburgh, Pa.: Jefferson Memorial Cemetery is the largest internment grounds in the Pittsburgh district. Within the cemetery is a special area dedicated just for veteran burials. To denote the site and honor those buried there, a war memorial was erected in 2016. The memorial consists of a polished granite pedestal designed with columns and bronze tablets. On the top of the of the pedestal, stands a life size drummer boy, in bronze, as if awaiting orders to signal the next call to duty. A fitting tribute to America's veterans.
   
War Between the States Musicians Memorial - Gettysburg, Pa.: The Musicians Memorial honoring the drummers and other musicians of the Civil War, located on LeFever St. in Unity Park, Gettysburg, Pa. was commissioned by a member of the Boy Scouts of America as an Eagle Scout project. The monument pedestal of Georgia gray granite, supports a life size bronze figure of a period Drummer, the first of its kind to memorialize the musicians of the war, both North and South, was dedicated in July 2015.
   
Culp Brothers Memorial- Gettysburg, Pa.: The Culp Brothers Memorial honoring the Culp family of Gettysburg, Pa., namely Pvt. John Wesley Culp, who served with the Confederate Army, and his brother Lt. William E. Culp, who served with the Union Army, "Brother against Brother''. During the Battle of Gettysburg, John Wesley was killed on family farm property and his body was never recovered. William survived the war and came home to live out his life. The shaft of pink granite with bronze bas relief portraits of both brothers grace the polished surface, surrounded by a walkway of veteran's bricks. The granite shaft is North I South oriented so as to place the portraits facing in the direction of the country each man served. The monument was a project of the Pvt. John Wesley Culp Memorial Camp #1961, Sons of Confederate Veterans of Gettysburg. Dedicated during the 150th Anniversaary of the Battle, July 2013 and is located on Steinwher Ave., Gettysburg, Pa.
   
Sisters - Mechanicsburg, Pa.: The Sisters was a private commission from a family near Mechanicsburg, and represents their love for the daughters. The girls are together, one sitting on the bench playing her guitar while the other sings along. Cast in bronze and placed in a nearby garden for the family and world to see generations into the future.
   
Coal Miners Memorial - Greenville, Ky.: The two coal miners, underground and surface miners, were commissioned by the City of Greenville, Ky. Greenville, located in Muhlenberg Co., is noted for its coal production and is one of the main sources of income within the county, therefore the memorial recognition. The life size figures, notably different in attire and equipment, delivers a powerful message of the history of the county. The bronze figures stand atop twin brick pedestals in a street side plaza on the left side of the Muhlenberg Co. Courthouse in Greenville. The work was erected in October 2015.
   
9-11 Memorial- Greenville, Ky.: The 9-11 Memorial was dedicated on Sept. 11, 2016. The Sculptor's design concept was intended to immolate the ferocity, destruction and heroism of that fateful day. Two granite columns representing the Twin Towers, one erect, the other collapsing as noted with the dark stone cloud insert near the top of the column. The columns support a steel beam originally from the 92nd floor of the tower. On the top end of the beam is attached a bronze American flag and screaming eagle, signifying the strength of America to overcome the magnitude of the event.
   
   
The monument replicas represented are but a few of the over one hundred pieces created in the past for battlefield preservation purposes. Although this collection is no longer available, the sculptor will reproduce your monument replica upon private commission request. For more information, please email us.
   
69th New York Inf., Irish Brigade
   
North Carolina State
   
1st Minn. Vol. Inf.
   
Alabama State
   
1st Vermont Brigade
   
7th Penna. Cavalry
   
   

Fund Raising

 
VMI Keydet Spirit Award: Sculpted for the Keydet Club of the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA. 2004.
   
Gettysburg Remembrance Trust coin: Sculpted for the Gettysburg Remembrance Trust, Gettysburg, PA, 2000. Commissioned in 2000 by the Friends of the Gettysburg National Parks, the coin displays representations of the Union Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren statue located on Little Round Top and the historic Copse of Trees both at Gettysburg National Military Park. Produced in gold, silver and bronze, the sale of the coin was the center piece of preservation awareness and fund raising for the Trust endeavor.
   
Coach Jim Phelan: Sculpted for Mount St. Mary's College and Seminary, Emmitsburg, MD, 2004.
Commissioned by the Athletic Dept. of Mount Saint Mary’s College, Emmitsburg, Maryland in 2000, the figure of Coach Phelan, was produced in miniature for presentation purposes to visiting dignitaries during special school ceremonies.
   
13th N.C. monument replica: Sculpted for the N.C. Living History Assoc. Charlotte, NC, 1999.
Located near Boonsboro, Maryland, at Fox’s Gap, on South Mountain, the life size bronze figure of a wounded confederate color bearer mounted of black granite was commissioned in 1997 by the Living History Association of Mecklenburg Co., Charlotte, North Carolina and unveiled October 2003. The monument was erected to honor all the North Carolina troops who served at South Mountain during the Gettysburg Campaign.